Brinks Home Security Safes

February 11, 2017
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Brink's sells an Internet-enabled smart safe called the CompuSafe Galileo. Despite being sold as a more secure safe, it's wildly insecure:

Vulnerabilities found in CompuSafe Galileo safes, smart safes made by the ever-reliable Brinks company that are used by retailers, restaurants, and convenience stores, would allow a rogue employee or anyone else with physical access to them to command their doors to open and relinquish their cash.

The hack has the makings of the perfect crime, because a thief could also erase any evidence that the theft occurred simply by altering data in a back-end database where the smartsafe logs how much money is inside and who accessed it.

Nothing about these vulnerabilities is a surprise to anyone who works in computer security:

But the safes have an external USB port on the side of the touchscreens that allows service technicians to troubleshoot and obtain a backup of the database. This, unfortunately, creates an easy entrypoint for thieves to take complete, administrative control of the devices.

"Once you're able to plug into that USB port, you're able to access lots of things that you shouldn't normally be able to access, " Petro told WIRED. "There is a full operating system...that you're able to...fully take over...and make [the safe] do whatever you want it to do."

The researchers created a malicious script that, once inserted into a safe on a USB stick, lets a thief automatically open the safe doors by emulating certain mouse and keyboard actions and bypassing standard application controls. "You plug in this little gizmo, wait about 60 seconds, and the door just pops open, " says Petro.

If it sounds like the people who designed this e-safe ignored all of the things we've learned about computer security in the last few decades, you're right. And that's the problem with Internet-of-Things security: it's often designed by people who don't know computer or Internet security.

They also haven't learned the lessons of full disclosure or rapid patching:

They notified Brinks about the vulnerabilities more than a year ago, but say the company appears to have done nothing to resolve the issues. Although Brinks could disable driver software associated with the USB port to prevent someone from controlling the safes in this way, or lock down the system and database so it's not running in administrative mode and the database can't be changed, but so far the company appears to have done none of these.

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Source: www.schneier.com
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